Gentle dentist for fearful adult. We understand your fears and concerns Dental Phobia – no reason to be ashamed! We're experienced dealing with a phobic patient Severe fear of going to the dentist? We take every concern  seriously Seriously dentist phobic. We work well with extremely fearful patients.
Very, very sensitive, gentle,calming dentist for extremely anxious patient Dentist for Major dental phobia. Won Best Dentist in Melbourne 2011 Terrified of dentists? Have strong anxiety about dental work? We know the realities of how you feel, we take them seriously and we are never judgmental or demeaning Dentist for the Fearful. Our practive have been highly recommended who work well with extemely fearful patients. Winner of Best dentist in Melbourne 2011
Dentist for someone is  very anxious and  mega-dental phobe. We are commited to changing how you're  feelings about dentistry and dentist Dental  Phobia - gentle dental office. We understand your fears and concerns. You'll find us gentle, calming, understanding and reassuring of your fear Nervous  Patients ? Find out about a gentle dental experience with the highest level of patient care. We look forward to working with your dental anxiety We always have time for nervous patients and would like to reassure you that we fully understand dental fears and phobias.
Our  goal is to lastingly get rid of our patient’s dental phobia and at the same time to achieve a healthy and attractive dental condition. Nervous Patients? Looking for dentist for nervous patients? Our dental clinic is focussed to deliver gentle dentistry Dentist for the Fearful. Our practive have been highly recommended who work well with extemely fearful patients. Winner of Best dentist in Melbourne 2011 As one of the leading Cosmetic & General Dentistry practice in Melbourne City, we’re committed to clinical excellence in a gentle,caring and relaxed environment

Best Dentist Melbourne | Dentist Melbourne | Dentist in Melbourne |Severe fear of going to the dentist? We take every concern seriously 

VOGUE SMILES MELBOURNE
Where beautiful smiles are designed to be remembered

Hate going to the Dentist? Nervous, anxious or scared of the dentist? We can help you get rid of your fear of the dentist. Based on Best Dentist reviews and recommendations in Melbourne for phobic-friendly dentists, Our practice won the Best dentist in Melbourne who are good with very nervous or phobic patients. Experience worry-free, painless dental procedures with sedation dentistry.

MANAGING DENTAL FEAR AND PHOBIA


MANAGING DENTAL EMERGENCIES

MANAGING DENTAL EMERGENCIES


DENTAL CONDITIONS


PREVENTATIVE DENTISTRY


TIPS FOR MUM AND DAD


RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

DENTAL JOKES

 

The information contained on this web site is for educational purpose only and is not meant to serve as delivery of professional care. The information in this Resource Page should not be relied upon to make decisions about your health that is Dental health. It is not a substitute for medical or dental advice.

Always consult your dentist about your individual condition(s) and/or circumstances.

 

Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD)

Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) occur as a result of problems with the jaw, jaw joint and surrounding facial muscles that control chewing and moving the jaw.

What Is the Temporomandibular Joint?

The temporomandibular joint is the hinge joint that connects the lower jaw (mandible) to the temporal bone of the skull, which is immediately in front of the ear on each side of your head. The joints are flexible, allowing the jaw to move smoothly up and down and side to side and enabling you to talk, chew, and yawn. Muscles attached to and surrounding the jaw joint control the position and movement of the jaw.

What Causes TMD?

The cause of TMD is not clear, but dentists believe that symptoms arise from problems with the muscles of the jaw or with the parts of the joint itself.

Injury to the jaw, temporomandibular joint, or muscles of the head and neck – such as from a heavy blow or whiplash – can cause TMD. Other possible causes include:

  • Grinding or clenching the teeth, which puts a lot of pressure on the TMJ

  • Dislocation of the soft cushion or disc between the ball and socket

  • Presence of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis in the TMJ

  • Stress, which can cause a person to tighten facial and jaw muscles or clench the teeth

What Are the Symptoms of TMD?

People with TMD can experience severe pain and discomfort that can be temporary or last for many years. More women than men experience TMD and TMD is seen most commonly in people between the ages of 20 and 40.

Common symptoms of TMD include:

  • Pain or tenderness in the face, jaw joint area, neck and shoulders, and in or around the ear when you chew, speak or open your mouth wide

  • Limited ability to open the mouth very wide

  • Jaws that get "stuck" or "lock" in the open- or closed-mouth position

  • Clicking, popping, or grating sounds in the jaw joint when opening or closing the mouth (which may or may not be accompanied by pain)

  • A tired feeling in the face

  • Difficulty chewing or a sudden uncomfortable bite – as if the upper and lower teeth are not fitting together properly

  • Swelling on the side of the face

Other common symptoms include toothaches, headaches, neckaches, dizziness, earaches, hearing problems, upper shoulder pain, and ringing in the ears (tinnitis).

How Is TMD Diagnosed?

Because many other conditions can cause similar symptoms – including a toothache, sinus problems, arthritis, or gum disease – your dentist will conduct a careful patient history and clinical examination to determine the cause of your symptoms.

He or she will examine your temporomandibular joints for pain or tenderness; listen for clicking, popping or grating sounds during jaw movement; look for limited motion or locking of the jaw while opening or closing the mouth; and examine bite and facial muscle function. Sometimes panoramic X-rays will be taken. These full face X-rays allow your dentist to view the entire jaws, TMJ, and teeth to make sure other problems aren't causing the symptoms. Sometimes other imaging tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a computer tomography (CT), are needed. The MRI views the soft tissue such as the TMJ disc to see if it is in the proper position as the jaw moves. A CT scan helps view the bony detail of the joint.

Your dentist may decide to send you to an oral surgeon (also called an oral and maxillofacial surgeon) for further care and treatment. This oral healthcare professional specializes in surgical procedures in and about the entire face, mouth and jaw area.

What Treatments Are Available for TMD?

Treatments range from simple self-care practices and conservative treatments to injections and surgery. Most experts agree that treatment should begin with conservative, nonsurgical therapies first, with surgery left as the last resort. Many of the treatments listed below often work best when used in combination.

Basic Treatments

  • Apply moist heat or cold packs. Apply an ice pack to the side of your face and temple area for about 10 minutes. Do a few simple stretching exercises for your jaw (as instructed by your dentist or physical therapist). After exercising, apply a warm towel or washcloth to the side of your face for about 5 minutes. Perform this routine a few times each day.

  • Eat soft foods. Eat soft foods such as yogurt, mashed potatoes, cottage cheese, soup, scrambled eggs, fish, cooked fruits and vegetables, beans and grains. In addition, cut foods into small pieces to decrease the amount of chewing required. Avoid hard and crunchy foods (like hard rolls, pretzels, raw carrots), chewy foods (like caramels and taffy) and thick and large foods that require your mouth to open wide to fit.

  • Take medications. To relieve muscle pain and swelling, try nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Aleve), which can be bought over-the-counter. Your dentist can prescribe higher doses of these or other NSAIDs or other drugs for pain such as narcotic pain relievers. Muscle relaxants, especially for people who grind or clench their teeth, can help relax tight jaw muscles. Anti-anxiety medications can help relieve stress that is sometimes thought to aggravate TMD. Antidepressants, when used in low doses, can also help reduce or control pain. Muscle relaxants, anti-anxiety drugs and antidepressants are available by prescription only.

  • Low-level laser therapy. This is used to reduce the pain and inflammation as well as increase range of motion to the neck and in opening the mouth.

  • Wear a splint or night guard. Splints and night guards are plastic mouthpieces that fit over the upper and lower teeth. They prevent the upper and lower teeth from coming together, lessening the effects of clenching or grinding the teeth. They also correct the bite by positioning the teeth in their most correct and least traumatic position. The main difference between splints and night guards is that night guards are only worn at night and splints are worn full time (24 hours a day for 7 days). Your dentist will discuss with you what type of mouth guard appliance you may need.

  • Undergo corrective dental treatments. Replace missing teeth; use crowns, bridges or braces to balance the biting surfaces of your teeth or to correct a bite problem.

  • Avoid extreme jaw movements. Keep yawning and chewing (especially gum or ice) to a minimum and avoid extreme jaw movements such as yelling or singing.

  • Don't rest your chin on your hand or hold the telephone between your shoulder and ear. Practice good posture to reduce neck and facial pain.

  • Keep your teeth slightly apart as often as you can to relieve pressure on the jaw. To control clenching or grinding during the day, place your tongue between your teeth.

  • Learning relaxation techniques to help control muscle tension in the jaw. Ask your dentist about the need for physical therapy or massage. Consider stress reduction therapy, including biofeedback.

More Controversial Treatments

When the basic treatments listed above prove unsuccessful, your dentist may suggest one or more of the following:

  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). This therapy uses low-level electrical currents to provide pain relief by relaxing the jaw joint and facial muscles. This treatment can be done at the dentist's office or at home.

  • Ultrasound. Ultrasound treatment is deep heat that is applied to the TMJ to relieve soreness or improve mobility.

  • Trigger-point injections. Pain medication or anesthesia is injected into tender facial muscles called "trigger points"" to relieve pain.

  • Radio wave therapy. Radio waves create a low level electrical stimulation to the joint, which increases blood flow. The patient experiences relief of pain in the joint.

-back to top-

Surgery

Surgery should only be considered after all other treatment options have been tried and you are still experiencing severe, persistent pain. Because surgery is irreversible, it is wise to get a second or even third opinion from other dentists.

There are three types of surgery for TMD: arthrocentesis, arthroscopy and open-joint surgery. The type of surgery needed depends on the TMD problem.

  • Arthrocentesis. This is a minor procedure performed in the office under general anesthesia. It is performed for sudden-onset, closed lock cases (restricted jaw opening) in patients with no significant prior history of TMJ problems. The surgery involves inserting needles inside the affected joint and washing out the joint with sterile fluids. Occasionally, the procedure may involve inserting a blunt instrument inside of the joint. The instrument is used in a sweeping motion to remove tissue adhesion bands and to dislodge a disc that is stuck in front of the condyle (the part of your TMJ consisting of the "ball" portion of the "ball and socket")

  • Arthroscopy. Patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery first are given general anesthesia. The surgeon then makes a small incision in front of the ear and inserts a small, thin instrument that contains a lens and light. This instrument is hooked up to a video screen, allowing the surgeon to examine the TMJ and surrounding area. Depending on the cause of the TMD, the surgeon may remove inflamed tissue or realign the disc or condyle.

Compared with open surgery, this surgery is less invasive, leaves less scarring, and is associated with minimal complications and a shorter recovery time. Depending on the cause of the TMD, arthroscopy may not be possible, and open-joint surgery may be necessary.

  • Open-joint surgery. Patients undergoing open-joint surgery also are first given a general anesthesia. Unlike arthroscopy, the entire area around the TMJ is opened so that the surgeon can get a full view and better access. There are many types of open-joint surgeries. This treatment may be necessary if:

 

    • The bony structures that comprise the jaw joint are deteriorating

    • There are tumors in or around your TMJ

    • There is severe scarring or chips of bone in the joint

Compared with arthroscopy, open-joint surgery results in a longer healing time and there is a greater chance of scarring and nerve injury.

Canker Sores

Also called Recurrent Apthous Stomatitis or Apthous Ulcers. Its unfortunately common disease characterized by development of painful, recurring solitary or multiple ulcerations of the of oral mucosa. Numerous possible causes have been suggested and these include Bacterial infection, Immunological abnormalities, nutritional deficiencies such as Iron, Vitamin B12 or Folic Acid. Precipitating Factors preceeding outbreak of Apthous Ulcers inlcude Local Trauma such as self-inflicted bites, oral surgical procedures, needle injections and dental trauma. Factos such as Endocrine conditions also exist. Most series show that the incidence is greatest during the premenstrual period. Many patients with Apthous Ulcers have a history of asthma, hay fever or drug allergies. Treatment. There is no specific treatment, over the years many drugs have been advocated. Although, it was found that Tetracycline mouthwash(250 mg) used four times daily for 5 to 7 days produced a good response in nearly 70% of the patients by relieving pain, reducing the size of the lession and reducing the healing time. An steriod ointment applied locally also showed effectiveness. Apthous Ulcer or Canker sores are often confused with Cold Sores or also called Herpes Labialis or fever blister. Although they are not the same. Cold sores, are groups of painful fluid-filled blisters. Unlike canker sores, cold sores are caused by a virus and are extremely contagious. Also, cold sores typically appear outside the mouth – usually, under the nose, around the lips, or under the chin while canker sores occur inside the mouth.

BAD BREATH OR HALITOSIS

What Is It?

Bad breath is breath that has an unpleasant odor. It's also known as halitosis. This odor can strike from time to time, or it can be long-lasting, depending on the cause.
Millions of bacteria live in the mouth, particularly on the back of the tongue. In many people, they are the primary causes of bad breath. The mouth's warm, moist conditions are ideal for the growth of these bacteria. Most bad breath is caused by something in the mouth.
Some types of bad breath are considered to be fairly normal. They usually are not health concerns. One example is "morning mouth." This occurs because of changes in your mouth while you sleep. During the day, saliva washes away decaying food and odors. The body makes less saliva at night. Your mouth becomes dry, and dead cells stick to your tongue and to the inside of your cheeks. When bacteria use these cells for food, they produce a foul odor.

In addition, bad breath can be caused by the following:

  • Poor dental hygiene - Infrequent or improper brushing and flossing, which allows bits of food to decay inside the mouth

  • Infections in the mouth - Periodontal (gum) disease

  • Respiratory tract infections - Throat, sinus or lung infections

  • External agents - Garlic, onions, coffee, cigarette smoking, chewing tobacco

  • Dry mouth (xerostomia) - Caused by salivary gland problems, medicines or "mouth breathing"

  • Systemic (bodywide) illnesses - Diabetes, liver disease, kidney disease, lung disease, sinus disease, reflux disease and others

  • Psychiatric illness - Some people may believe they have bad breath, but others do not notice it. This is referred to as "pseudohalitosis."

Symptoms

You may not always know that you have bad breath. That's because odor-detecting cells in the nose eventually get used to the smell. Other people may notice and react by recoiling as you speak.

Other symptoms depend on the underlying cause of bad breath:


Poor dental hygiene - Teeth are coated with film or plaque. You may have food trapped between the teeth and pale or swollen gums.

Infections in the mouth - Symptoms depend on the type of infection. They can include:

  • Red or swollen gums that may bleed easily, especially after brushing or flossing

  • Pus between teeth or a pocket of pus (abscess) at the base of a tooth

  • Loose teeth or a change in how a denture fits

  • Painful, open sores on the tongue or gums

Respiratory tract infections - Sore throat, swollen lymph nodes ("swollen glands") in the neck, fever, stuffy nose, a greenish or yellowish nasal discharge, a mucus-producing cough

External agents - Cigarette stains on fingers and teeth, a uniform yellow "coffee stain" on teeth

Dry mouth - Symptoms may include:

  • Difficulty swallowing dry foods

  • Difficulty speaking for a long time because of mouth dryness

  • Burning in the mouth

  • An unusually high number of cavities

  • Dry eyes (in Sjögren's syndrome)

Systemic (bodywide) illnesses - Symptoms of diabetes, lung disease, kidney failure or liver disease

Diagnosis

A dentist or physician may notice bad breath during an office visit. Sometimes, the smell of the patient's breath may suggest a likely cause for the problem. For example, "fruity" breath may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes. A urine-like smell, especially in a person who is at high risk of kidney disease, can sometimes indicate kidney failure.

Your dentist will review your medical history for conditions that can cause bad breath and for medicines that can cause dry mouth. Your dentist also will ask you about your diet, personal habits (smoking, chewing tobacco) and any symptoms. He or she also will ask who noticed the bad breath and when.

Your dentist will examine your teeth, gums, mouth and salivary glands. He or she also will feel your head and neck and will evaluate your breath when you exhale from your nose and from your mouth.

Your dentist may refer you to your family physician if a bodywide illness is the most likely cause. In severe cases of gum disease, your dentist may suggest that you see a periodontist (dentist who specializes in gum problems).

You will need diagnostic tests if the doctor suspects a lung infection, diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease or Sjögren's syndrome. The type of tests you get depends on the suspected illness. You may get blood tests, urine tests, X-rays of the chest or sinuses, or other tests.

Expected Duration

How long bad breath lasts depends on its cause. For example, when the problem results from poor dental hygiene, proper dental care will begin to freshen the mouth right away. You'll have even better results after a few days of regular brushing and flossing. Periodontal disease and tooth abscess also respond quickly to proper dental treatment.

Bad breath caused by chronic sinusitis may keep coming back, especially if it is caused by a structural abnormality of the sinuses.

Bad breath that results from a systemic illness may be a long-term problem. It often can be controlled with proper medical care.

PREVENTION

Maintaining good oral health is essential to reducing bad breath. Schedule regular dental visits for a professional cleaning and checkup. If you think you have constant bad breath, keep a log of the foods you eat and make a list of medications you take. Some medications may play a role in creating mouth odors. Let your dentist know if you've had any surgery or illness since your last appointment.

Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste to remove food debris and plaque. Brush your tongue, too. Once a day, use floss or an interdental cleaner to clean between teeth.

Mouthwashes are generally cosmetic and do not have a long-lasting effect on bad breath. If you must constantly use a breath freshener to hide unpleasant mouth odor, see your dentist. If you need extra help in controlling plaque, your dentist may recommend using a special antimicrobial mouth rinse. A fluoride mouth rinse, used along with brushing and flossing, can help prevent tooth decay.

You also can combat bad breath by drinking plenty of water every day to help your body make saliva. An occasional swish of the mouth with water can loosen bits of food. Other products can help you keep breath fresh and prevent plaque from forming. They include:

  • Sugar-free gum

  • Sugarless breath mints

  • Raw carrots

  • Celery

The treatment of bad breath depends on its cause.

Call your dentist promptly if you have bad breath with loose teeth or painful, swollen gums that bleed easily. Also, call your doctor if you have bad breath along with any of the following symptoms:

  • Fever

  • Sore throat

  • Postnasal drip

  • Discolored nasal discharge

  • Cough that produces mucus

Even if you have none of these symptoms, call your dentist or physician if your bad breath continues despite a good diet and proper dental hygiene.


Bad breath may be the sign of a medical disorder, such as a local infection in the respiratory tract, chronic sinusitis, postnasal drip, chronic bronchitis, diabetes, gastrointestinal disturbance, liver or kidney ailment. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your family doctor or a specialist to determine the cause of bad breath.

-back to top-

Page 1 2 4 5 6

Featured Patient Education: Find this and more:

Scared of Going to the Dentist? The Feel Good Guide to going to the Dentist
10 Tips to Help You Overcome Dentist Phobia
Treatment Methods of Overcoming Dental Phobia
A Simple 5 Minute Cure for Dental Anxiety
Dental Emergency and Procedures
Common Sources of Dental Pain
Tips for Mum and Dad
Basic Brushing and Flossing
Financial Strategies to Keep you Smiling

More Featured Articles > 

Vogue Smiles Melbourne | voguesmiles.com.au | cosmeticdentist-in-melbourne.com.au | dentist-in-melbourne.com.au

drzenaidycastro.com.au | preferreddentalcaremelbourne.com.au | sensational-smiledesign.com.au | smiledentistmelbournecity.com.au



CLICK IMAGE FOR MORE DETAILS

Our Practice| Dentist Melbourne Dr Zenaidy Castro| Meet the Team| WHY US?| General Dentistry| Cosmetic Dentistry| Emergency dental treatments| Other Services| Smile Gallery of Before and After| Videos| Blog| Contact and Locations| Dental Finance| SPECIAL OFFERS| Dental Phobias| Practice & Privacy Policies| Our Warranty| Visit our Main Website

FIND US ON: Melbourne Cosmetic Dentistry| Preferred Dental Care| Cosmetic Dentist in Melbourne| Dentist in Melbourne| Smile Dentist in Melbourne| Vogue Smiles Melbourne| Street Directory| Only Melbourne| Aussie Web| I Do Wedding Directory| Australian Business Directory| DLook| Start Local| Gay Directory Melbourne| Dentist Australia| Seek Local| Hotfrog| Good Reviews Australia| Health Engine| Zippcast| Human Services Directory| Daily Motion| RateMDs| Pink Pages| Yellow Book| Find My Dentist

TRADING TERMS & CONDITIONS | DISCLAIMER: WWW.VOGUESMILES.COM.AU Melbourne City Australia : Dental Clinic in Melbourne : Dr. Zenaidy Castro has posted this website about cosmetic and general dentistry treatments for informational purposes only. We posted an informative and relevant different dental topics but the content within these pages should not be perceived as formal dental advice, nor does the understanding constitute a formal relationship with Dr. Castro. Contact our office to schedule a consultation for formal advice. Please read our Practice terms and conditions in Get to Know us page for more details. We are happy to assist Cosmetic and general dentistry patients in Melbourne CBD City 3000 and Melbourne surrounding areas. If you’re looking for GOOD DENTIST IN MELBOURNE, look no further. We’re highly trained and experienced. We are Friendly, Skilled and Gentle. You would love us!